Nice Rack

Hey, what else could I call a post about a firewood rack? “How to DIY a Cheap, Easy, and Fast Firewood Rack?”  Nah. Too boring.

Some of you remember “Treemageddon” last spring here, here, and here.  It left us with a surprisingly large amount of free firewood which we burned last winter.

Lots of firewood...no rack

Lots of firewood…no rack

We noticed, however, that the bug population where we kept the wood exploded. This is not comforting when you have a lot of wood siding 4 feet away.  In order to stop the bugs, you only need to get the wood off of the ground.  Hence, the need for a Firewood Rack.  This was surprisingly easy.  Since most wood racks on the market are $100-$300, this is an easy way to save some cash while looking like you know what you’re doing!

Supplies:

(2) Cinder Blocks = $2.76

(2) Landscape Timbers = $7.94

(4) Mini Fence Posts = $12.68

TOTAL = $23.38

Supplies for the Wood Rack

Supplies for the Wood Rack

Step 1:

Determine where you want your rack.  Make sure you don’t have the wood touching anything except the rack or there is a greater risk of bugs eating the wood (or your siding!).  Also make sure it’s not sitting in standing water or that will defeat the purpose of building the rack in the first place!

Step 2:

Place cinder block where you want the rack and slide one end of the landscape timber into the hole of the cinder block.

Landscape Timber in Cinder Block

Landscape Timber in Cinder Block

Step 3:

Do the same thing with the other landscape timber.

Both Landscape Timbers in Cinder Block

Both Landscape Timbers in Cinder Block

Step 4:

Place the other ends of the landscape timbers in the other cinder block (did I mention this was ridiculously easy?).  It helps to have one person making sure you don’t slide the wood out the other end!

Base of the DIY Wood Rack

Base of the DIY Wood Rack

Step 5:

Hammer in a green fence post so it blocks the hole of the cinder block using a 3 lb sledgehammer if you have one…a regular hammer works but it’ll take a while.  This prevents the landscape timbers from ever sliding out and gives you something to stack your firewood against.

A 3 lb Sledge Hammer makes quick work of the fence post

A 3 lb Sledge Hammer makes quick work of the fence post

Step 6:

Repeat 3 more times on the outside of every cinder block hole.

Notice how the landscape timbers can't slide out

Notice how the landscape timbers can’t slide out

Step 7:

Stack the wood on it.  That’s it. You’re done.  It should look somewhat like this:

Cheap DIY Wood Rack

Cheap DIY Wood Rack

 

Affordable DIY Wood Rack with wood on it

Affordable DIY Wood Rack with wood on it

 

Is it pretty? No. Does it work really well? Yep. The whole thing took about 15 minutes and saved us about $100.  Can’t beat that!  Time to go find some firewood!

What do you think?  What happens when you put a lightsaber in water?  When sign makers go on strike, is anything written on their signs? Why are there interstate highways in Hawaii? If a bee is allergic to pollen would it get the hives?

3 comments

  1. Jennifer L says:

    I think it looks great, especially once loaded with wood. My only suggestion would be to put on something like rebar impalement safety caps (even though it’s not rebar). If someone hopped your fence, even a thief, they might sue you from getting injured on the exposed poles – not to mention feeling horrible about someone getting injured on your property. Peace of mind. It might even give it a finished look that is more peaceful to the eye.

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